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Melvin Jones

Their Pluses

In May 1995, under the leadership of Jorge Saavedra Nunez  and Eliana Palma of Saavedra, the medical-educational center Melvin Jones was officially created in the city of La Libertad, located in the province of Santa Elena, in southwest of Ecuador.

The perception of disability was very negative at this time; any child with a physical or mental handicap endured a heavy moral and social stigma that accompanied such a situation. The child’s family often suffered the effects of this vicious circle and the child found himself isolated and without access to care or quality education.

Aware that this perception of disability is linked to a misunderstanding of the latter, those involved in the center Melvin Jones have decided to take action to raise public awareness and bring together as many players around their project. (parents, faculty members, politicians, local civil society etc...).

To achieve the goal, the center has implemented outreach meetings involving people directly or indirectly affected by disability, in order to have a clear view of activities to implement.

Following these meetings, the center Melvin Jones has decided to support families with disabled children, with community care and a series of projects aimed at integrating the child in society .

Melvin Jones provides the children of these families, usually low-income, with school quality monitoring as well as appropriate vocational training facilitating their integration into the labor market.

In parallel to this substantive work, the organization’s founders, management and professionals deliver daily awareness-raising sessions at various civil society bodies, in order to increase consideration and insertion of people with disabilities within the society.

Numerous actions implemented in terms of education, vocational training and care, have improved the welfare recipients and have helped them gain autonomy.

Melvin Jones

Welcomes people with disabilities, generally from low-income families and offer them the opportunity to follow a tailored academic course, receive therapeutic care and professional education.

Coast / Santa Elena
7;-2.232387452580107;-80.90901156249998
Health Education
Kids Adolescents Young adults Adults
Human Material

News

A guided visit for all to Ecuador’s first museum of palaeontology

October, Monday 27 2014

 

On Monday 27th October, children and young people from the Melvin Jones education centre, together with their teachers, started the week with a visit to the palaeontology museum at the University of the Santa Elena peninsula. The university students had developed a visitor programme especially for people with disabilities, the same programme that the young people from Melvin Jones were invited to sample. The children and young people from the Melvin Jones centre enjoyed a guided tour and educational films – all for free.

 In other news, seven teachers have been taking part for the last six weeks in a Braille course at the Polytechnic University of Salesiana. Up till now, just one teacher has mastered the language. We are delighted with this news !

Translated by Elizabeth Brook



The Melvin Jones centre gets all dressed up to celebrate International Childhood Day.

May, Friday 31 2013

Officially celebrated on 1 June in Ecuador, International Childhood Day came a little early at the Melvin Jones centre, La Libertad. In other words, Juanita Chumo, the centre director, and her dedicated staff couldn't bear to spend only a single day on all the activities they had planned for the occasion.

So the festivities began on Thursday 30 May at 9 am. And what a beginning! The Mayor of La Libertad in person played host to five of the centre's beneficiaries for an offical breakfast.

The five guests were representative of each of the types of handicap treated by the centre: motor, visual, auditory, psychological and mental handicap. Each one a symbol. And each person took the opportunity to describe the problems they face before taking a guided tour of the municipal premises.

After this very serious morning, the pressure was taken off our five representatives. They joined the other beneficiaries and the centre's teachers for a relaxing afternoon at the cinema. And even here education was the theme; the activity was aimed at teaching young people to respect road signs, to obey instructions and in a general manner how to interact socially.

 

The following day, the whole of the Melvin Jones team was present at the centre. Pupils from the Libertad College came to participate in the event, together with members of the Lions Club and a handful of journalists who were curious about the gathering. Including students, their families, teachers and other guests, nearly 200 people were present for this festive afternoon. And what a party it was! First of all, the pupils of the nearby high school gave a dressed up representation, with songs and choreographies in which participate the pupils of Melvin Jones.

 

 

Then came the dance competitions involving parents and teachers, to a lively background of salsa and cumbia music. Then the beneficiaries got involved, accompanied by their able-bodied friends from the Libertad college, to remind everyone that dancing isn't about an "able/disabled" distinction. By this time the rhythms were infectious. So much so that our friends from the Super newspaper got up themselves to try out a few (clumsy) salsa steps!

Without a shadow of a doubt, these two days will remain in the memories of all those who were lucky enough to be present. They were two days of perfect communion between adolescents and adults, parents and teachers, able-bodied and disabled.

A word to the wise…



Melvin Jones delivers a workshop on inclusive education at Cerezal Bellavista School.

May, Wenesday 22 2013

Cerezal Bellavista School is an experimental agricultural school. It currently educates around 170 children; some of these are boarders. It has been open for three years, and it runs on an educational model inspired by Zamorano Agricultural University in Honduras.

In Cerezal Bellavista, the children “learn by doing”. Lessons are confined to the morning. In the afternoon, in groups, with the help of an agricultural engineer, the children take part in agricultural activities.

After a tour of the school buildings and grounds, Juanita Chumo, the Director of Melvin Jones Center, Mariela Ortega,  a psychologist, and Rebecca Labrador, a volunteer from UODP, delivered some training on inclusive education to teachers at the school. The goal of this training was to raise awareness among teachers about classroom habits which would guarantee equality of rights and opportunity for all children who have a disability and/or are in some way vulnerable.

Here is what Rebecca had to say about this training:

“Even though the school has not yet taken in any children with a disability, the short-term goal was to enable the school to offer inclusive education. For example, in two months’ time, the new school buildings will be finished, and equipped with access ramps.”

“The teachers were very interested and motivated to learn. Juanito Chumo left various training documentation with them so that they could further develop the methods they were taught.”

The team from Melvin Jones have a proven track record of delivering training of this kind. Hundreds of teachers from around Manabí have already benefited from their expertise. When it comes to spreading the model of inclusive education, Melvin Jones is a highly-valued partner to the Ecuadorian Ministry of Education. 



Melvin Jones takes part in the International Day of Persons with Disabilities (IDPWD)

December, Monday 3 2012

Dignity, respect and decency were just some of the demands emblazoned on placards in a procession that kicked off this IDPWD. The fourteen associations and their beneficiaries marched through the streets of Santa Elena, accompanied by the Eugenio Espejo high school music group who came to lend their support.

After the parade, all the attendees gathered around the big central stage in the Parc Rocafuerte, which was given over to a series of different artistic performances throughout the morning. So it was that five young girls with hearing disabilities, all pupils at the Melvin Jones school, presented their choreography set to tropical, infectious music... and yet most of them couldn't hear even a note of it. The illusion was perfect, the girls' steps in rhythm. And the applause, fed by the 150-strong audience, showed that the public fully grasped the reality of the performance.

At the side of the stage there were also stands where the associations highlighted another of their pupils' capabilities: manual creations. Melvin Jones exhibited a range of artistic objects, such as decorative boxes made of papier mâché, and confectionery, also the handiwork of the association's beneficiaries.

The final word was spoken through the mic by a young girl suffering from impaired mobility: "We can create and produce things too, and we deserve proper attention from society!" And if this reminder was needed before, there's now no doubt that she's right.



Personal development workshop for mothers of physically handicapped children

October, Monday 22 2012

The reason for the creation of this workshop is the health situation of children affected by cerebral palsy and other associated disabilities.

The workshop was conducted with a group of ten mothers, and focused on improving their self-esteem.  To do so, we practiced relaxation techniques and devoted time to listening to our feelings and emotions, reflecting on how our lives have been with our children, and the impact on our families.

The group of mothers, who attend the centre for physical therapies and stimulation, face many obstacles in their daily lives, amongst them the health of their children, the lack of support for their families, inadequate medical attention and difficulties in relating to their surroundings.  All this amounts to a heavy burden resting on these women.

During the workshop, the women expressed the love which drives them to carry on for their children, this immense love which comes from a superior source to which the women turn day after day: from God, who gives them strength to keep on fighting for the progress of their children.  The workshop also provided an opportunity for women to exchange experiences with other mothers, who have older children, and to discover that they share the same values, such as hope, patience, tolerance, responsibility, joy and above all, love.

The participants made posters displaying these values to share with their families.  Now, they take part in the therapies and have become more willing and expressive, with the promise to return in the future for another workshop.



How you can help

January, Wenesday 1 2014

Specialist in Spanish sign language (Training)

Besoins humains
More...

Specialist in Spanish sign language (Training)

Besoins humains

The Melvin Jones centre attends to a large group of hearing impaired individuals. impairments. There are not enough technical staff and teachers to pay sufficient attention to and communicate with the students. In order to enable all the teachers to better focus on the children and to work with them more efficiently at the Centre, we need a specialist to train the professional team in sign language.

-Field/topic to be covered by training:
Spanish sign language (Ecuadorian level one)

-Training objectives:
To train the professionals of the “Melvin Jones” education centre in sign language to enable them to communicate better with hearing impaired students.
To enable the team to pass on what they’ve learnt to the parents of the students.
To be able to rely on a group of professionals to work with people living in distant communities through basic community rehabilitation.

-Description of the desired training:
The training will be in small groups lasting two hours.

-Expectations and objectives of the foundation with regards to the training:
To enable hearing impaired children to become more integrated into society and improve communication with their respective family members.

-Length of training (hours/work days) and required attendance:
The training will last two weeks, from Monday to Friday. The trainer will deliver eight hours of training per day in two-hour blocks to each group, the staff will be available to the trainer during his/her stay.

-Typical day of training:
From 8:00AM to 10:00AM
10:00AM to 12:00PM
2:00PM to 4:00PM
4:00PM to 6:00PM

-Profile of the specialist/technician required to deliver the training:
Language therapist who would like to share his/her knowledge and experience, with a supportive, collaborative and patient attitude.

-Desired length of training:
Two weeks

-Proposed location to be used for training:
Within the centre

-Language of trainer:
Spanish, intermediate level

-Estimated costs of the training:
The institution will cover the room and board costs during the training in addition to the operating costs of the training.

-Hosting possibilities (accommodation, food, costs to be covered by the foundation):
Room and Board

Curriculum Vitae + Covering letter

benevolat@uneoptiondeplus.org

January, Wenesday 1 2014
January, Wenesday 1 2014

Project and fundraising manager

Besoins humains
More...

Project and fundraising manager

Besoins humains

=>Title of post:
Project and fundraising manager

=>Location of the mission:
Centro de Educación Integral “Melvin Jones”, barrio 28 de mayo: Av. 16 entre calles 13 y 14, La Libertad, Ecuador

=>Context in which the request was made:
Melvin Jones is an institution that works with disabled boys, girls and teenagers from the Santa Elena province. It has accomplished some of its goals but needs to strengthen and develop its partnerships

=>Description of the mission:
Our Center is a non-profit institution that has as its mission to bring quality care and a warm welcome to boys, girls, teenagers, and their families in order to secure their successful integration into the community. The objectives of the project manager’s mission will be to initiate reflection in the center with the collaboration of the team members, to draw up a schedule of activities inside and outside the center, and to generate funding from diverse sources with the objective of guaranteeing better reception for the children.

=>Objectives of the mission:
With the support of the entire Melvin Jones center team and the Une Option de Plus foundation, the volunteer will work to:
-Develop a logical framework to provide the overall structure for activities and projects in development now and in the future.
-Implement micro-income generating projects in relationship with those defined in the logical framework
-Participate in the conduct of these micro-projects.

=>Organizational sustainability with respect to the volunteer:
The mission’s objective is to help the Melvin Jones center acquire the tools and methods necessary for tracking projects, and to further advance the reorientation process of its partner organizations.

=>Length of the mission :
Six months if possible.

=>Number of hours per day and number of days worked per week:
Monday through Friday 8:30 to 12:00 and 2:00 to 5:00

=>Describe the volunteer’s typical day:
Organizing the workday
Outlining program strategies
Visiting projects
Organizing meetings to review the work performed

=>Special conditions of the mission (optional)
The institution proposes to seek among local friends for the help required for the proposed study.

=>Previous experience:
-International development and project management
-Management of private and non-profit organizations
-Experience of project implementation, methodology and tracking; ability to communicate with sponsors, and experience in drafting progress reports.
-Fundraising

=>Educational background:
Training in project management

=>Level of Spanish:
Intermediate

=>Skills and qualifications required:
-Interest in international cooperation
-Ability to create good relationships
-Patience and independence
-Ability to transmit knowledge
-Ability to adapt
-Ability to create good relationships with children

=>Costs covered by the association:
Melvin Jones possesses an eco-friendly building that can serve to accommodate one person.

=>Costs covered by the volunteer:
The Center is committed to finding accommodation at a reduced cost for the volunteer.

=>Type of proposed reception (housing, food, etc.):
Food.

=>How to get to the place of training from the nearest airport. Approximate travel time between the airport and the structure.
From Guayaquil airport, the volunteer should transfer to the bus terminal or taxi ($2) and from there take a CLP bus, LIBERPESA, CICA for $3.50.
Upon arriving at La Libertad Av. 9 de octubre, take a taxi for $1 to C.E.I “Melvin Jones” (B. 28 de mayo: Av. 16 between 13th and 14th streets - next to la Dirección de Salud Provincial). Don’t forget to notify the institution in advance on +593 (0) 2782744 (the institution’s landline) or +593 (0)88725197 (the educational director’s cell phone number).

Curriculum Vitae+Cover letter in Spanish

benevolat@uneoptiondeplus.org

January, Wenesday 1 2014

Overview

Nonprofits educational centre of Private Law with a social or public goal, legally established in No. 179 of May 8,1998 Education ministry

Melvin Jones center is located in La Libertad to the west of the province of Santa Elena. La Libertad is a city in southwestern Ecuador, capital of La Libertad district, located 110 kilometers from Guayaquil, which is the economic capital of the country.
At the head of a district of 95 942 inhabitants (according to the census conducted in 2010 by the national institute of statistics and censuses) La Libertad is the economic capital of the region due to employments generated by the fishing and oil industries.

Aware of the fact that many families were in a vulnerable situation with disabled children, Jorge Saavedra Nunez, then president of « Club de Leones Salinas Central » made an act to establish a support center for them. When the act was accepted, contacts were established with the department of the ministry of education of the province of Guayas in order to sensitize the staff of the institution and the disability issues in the region.
Steps have then been undertaken in the province of Santa Elena in order to cense again the number of children with disabilities and to quantify this phenomenon that had never been measured.

This census also aimed to identify the potential of a structure that could accommodate future beneficiaries of the center, bring up disability awareness to the population and attract the attention of parents on the importance of supporting quality education for their children.
In 1994, the census confirmed the urgent need to establish a reception center; it was decided to establish a formal education, despite the limited economic resources of families.
Recognizing the importance of uniting as many players around their project, the center set up outreach meetings involving people directly or indirectly affected by disabilities in order to have a clear view of activities to implement.

On May 8, 1995, the Melvin Jones center officially became a nonprofit institution under the law of Ecuador, under the Ministry of Education. This recognition as a legally incorporated structure will allow it to start its activities and welcome children, which was not previously possible for legal reasons.
A project originally set up at the home of one of the members of the« Club de Leones Salinas Central » in preparation for supporting children with hearing loss problems.
Very quickly, support workshops designed for children with developmental handicaps or palsy were established. In 2000, local authorities decided that the « Club de Leones Salinas Central » was too small and overwhelmed, thus, the association soon considered a proposal to build a more spacious and ergonomic construction project that could welcome a larger number of children.
Led by Jorge Saavedra Nunez and Eliana Palma de Saavedra, the municipality of La Libertad (who donated the land) and with the financial support of the German association Guayas Ecuador Hilfe, this construction project was made possible. The center, which opened on July 20, 2002, still stands today and offers children academic coaching, therapy sessions, therapy sessions, and workshops accompanying young adults in the workplace.

Once with 28 children that received services in 1995, Melvin Jones is now home to 177 children daily, to which are added the more occasional visits. The center asks parents for a contribution so that they can be involved in the education process that was developed for their children.
Featuring today a structure adapted to the needs of its beneficiaries, the center has always aimed to improve its services vis-à-vis the children it welcomes, but also to transfer its methodology to civil society and notably national education professors through regular training sessions.

Barrio 28 de Mayo, Av 16, entre calles 13 y 14, La Libertad, Santa Elena, Ecuador

La Libertad

Central office: +593 (0)4 27 82 744
Juanita Chumo de Tamayo, Director: + 593 (0)4 27 84 290 / + 593 (0)8 87 25 197
Eliana de Palma, President: + 593 (0)4 27 83 969 / + 593 (0)9 34 50 236
Carmen Olives, Secretary: + 593 (0)4 27 74 117 / + 593 (0)9 41 70 925

melvinjones95@hotmail.com (administrative contact)
juanitachumogilces@hotmail.com (director of the center contact)
carmeno705@hotmail.com (secretary contact)
katyneira@hotmail.es (assistant secretary contact)

Facebook: www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001288150398

ceimelvinjones.org/

The founding members of the center in 1995 are still present today within the structure. Their respective roles have not changed much, even though currently they can count on their very competent staff, which allows the center to function well. The team is committed and united behind the goals set by the center. It is open to any external support that could enable it to develop new activities.

Contribute to the welfare and independence of people with disabilities

OS1. Promote access to education for children with disabilities.

OS2. Improve the quality of life and health status of children with disabilities.

OS3. The empowerment of people with disabilities.

OS4. Facilitate the professional integration of youth and young adult beneficiaries from the center

OS5. Educate peers of children with disabilities to the importance of proper management of disability.

1. Care center for children with disabilities. The objective of the association is to provide children with therapeutic care adapted to their situation. This project involves a technical team with diverse skills to provide the most complete monitoring and an additional child welfare center. The Melvin Jones center develops activities organized around the needs of the child and his/her family circle to make a better life in the long run to its beneficiaries. Melvin Jones seeks primarily to facilitate the integration of children with disabilities and reduce the social disadvantages they may face. This project is based on the assumption that children with disabilities can attend the same social integration as "valid" children. The objective of this project is to ensure that children with disabilities and their families become actors of his change and to integrate him into the community.

2. Support for beneficiaries to the professional world. Melvin Jones considers that the acceptance of difference is not natural in our society and it is important to do some work to raise awareness among civil society actors on the phenomenon of disability and its implications. Besides raising awareness, the center sets up a series of professional training to ensure that recipients are fully integrated into society and that they can develop. The center tries to instil in all its educators, teachers, therapists, staff and parents of students that it is very important to accompany the child throughout his professional integration. This process consists of three phases: orientation, training and integration. Each phase is considered as an element necessary for the preparation of the recipient to the next phase.

3. Access to autonomy for disabled children. The association organizes various workshops to facilitate integration and access to the autonomy of adolescents and young adults. These workshops address aspects of everyday life through simple but routine tasks (culinary workshop, home maintenance, support for completing classes...). Assuming that many external factors are influencing the degree of autonomy of the person with disability, whether or not motorized, professionals structure their utmost to stimulate each child by confronting him or her to regular daily life situations.

4. Awareness workshops destined for civil society. The center set up awareness workshops for teachers in the province of Santa Elena so that they can integrate children with disabilities into their classrooms. Parents of disabled children also benefit from training sessions; along with the technical team, they construct appropriate programs and a personalized plan of education specific to each child. The association wishes to raise awareness in society as a whole, through awareness and support workshops so that the phenomenon of disability becomes more acceptable and considered.

1. Related activities OS1. Promote access to education for children with disabilities.
- Realization of courses adapted to handicaps of each child attending the center.
- Creation of courses for students with hearing impairments or dumb.
- Computer Training and Multimedia

2. Related activities OS2. Improve the quality of life and health status of children with disabilities.
- Physiotherapy sessions which aim to assess, restore and maintain physical function of the individual (paraffin equipment, pacemaker, parallel bars, hot and cold compresses, infrared); audiometry
- Counselling sessions that encourage the child with special learning needs to maximize his or her ability to learn and transfer it to the problems encountered in daily life.
- Speech therapy sessions to treat joint disorders, speech, voice, the spoken and written language, and those of communication.

3. Related activities OS3. The empowerment of people with disabilities.
- Behavioural therapy sessions. This activity is to replicate situations of everyday life (outings, participation in events (sporting, cultural...), personal hygiene, culinary workshop...
- Occupational therapy sessions conducted in a home-workshop space where clients learn to perform various chores.


4. OS4 related activities. Facilitate the professional integration of youth and young adult beneficiaries from the center
- Handicrafts (painting, paper mache creation, making a rag doll, weaving, jewellery)
- Workshop bakery

5. Related activities OS5. Educate peers of children with disabilities to the importance of proper management of disability.
- Consulting and training for teachers of the schools 'traditional' in terms of establishment of appropriate educational tools or ergonomics of the space
- Awareness sessions for parents to follow the interest of inclusive education for their children.

Directly affected population:
210 children, adolescents and adults, aged between 1 and 45, enjoy the activities developed by the center Melvin Jones. The social and geographical origin of children and adolescents enrolled in school is very diverse. The center is unique in the township of La Libertad, some families far removed from the structure do not hesitate to make long journeys for the welfare of their children. Registration is open to all, regardless of age or condition of economic resources. Financial participation, even symbolic, however, is required for all families so that they are fully invested in the project set up by the center Melvin Jones.

Population affected indirectly.
The action of Melvin Jones also benefits for parents of school children through training workshops, advice or to field visits by professionals working within or in partnership with Melvin Jones. No studies have been conducted specifically to determine the impact of the action of the center and the affected population is difficult to identify. Meetings within and outside the structure, training sessions for teachers from neighbouring schools, events conducted within the structure can reach a large number of people without being able to advance a specific figure. It also considers indirect beneficiaries, all persons who, although not receiving direct training, are aware of the problems treated, through radio ads, posters, flyers and via their participation in roundtables training.

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